Displayed at: It is held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Subsequently the influence of Caravaggio became widespread; it appeared in the work of both Franz Halls and Rembrandt in Holland. The Musicians or Concert of Youths (c. 1595) is a painting by the Italian Baroque master Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571–1610). [4], Portrait of a Courtesan (Fillide Melandroni), The Conversion of Saint Paul on the Road to Damascus, Madonna of Loreto (Madonna dei Pellegrini, Pilgrims' Madonna), Madonna and Child with St. Anne (Madonna de Palafrenieri), Portrait of Alof de Wignacourt and his Page, Nativity with St. Francis and St. Lawrence, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=The_Musicians_(Caravaggio)&oldid=963385494, Paintings of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, This page was last edited on 19 June 2020, at 14:47. Caravaggio. By using our website you accept our conditions of use of cookies to track data and create content (including advertising) based on your interest. Caravaggio was active in Rome, Naples, Malta, and Sicily from the early 1590s to 1610. Find out more about what data we collect and use at, Quick search helps finding an artist, picture, user or article and prompts your previous searches, Login to use Arthive functionality to the maximum, Register to use Arthive functionality to the maximum, This action is only available to registered users. Usually, in these times painters were presenting Music as a single, idealized female figure. The picture is an allegory relating music to the sustenance of love in the same way that food is the sustenance of life.[2]. Caravaggio has conceived the allegory in a style that remains intentionally and provocatively ambivalent. The Musicians or Concert of Youths (c. 1595) is a painting by the Italian Baroque master Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571–1610). Google Arts & Culture features content from over 2000 leading museums and archives who have partnered with the Google Cultural Institute to bring the world's treasures online. [1], Scenes showing musicians were a popular theme at the time—the Church was supporting a revival of music and new styles and forms were being tried, especially by educated and progressive prelates such as Del Monte. The painting is in poor condition, and the music in the manuscript has been badly damaged by past restorations, although a tenor and an alto part can be made out. We make it easy to collect and publish everything about art, manage collections, and buy, sell and promote artworks. Posiblemente se trate de meros conocidos o amigos de Caravaggio, dado el gran realismo del cuadro. The musicians are rehearsing madrigals and the lute player in the center is transported by the music, his wet eyes and … En esta pintura se aprecia a un trío de jóvenes músicos, probablemente ensayando o dando un concierto. Caravaggio has left few drawings, but this may not mean he did not make drawings, but rather he did not value them highly enough to preserve them carefully. Four boys tune their instruments or … The Musicians or Concert of Youths (c. 1595) is a painting by the Italian Baroque master Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571–1610). [1] The cupid bears a strong resemblance to the boy in Boy Peeling Fruit, done a few years before, and also to the angel in Saint Francis of Assisi in Ecstasy. This painting, a variation on Caravaggio's masterpiece in The violin in the foreground suggests a fifth participant, implicitly including the viewer in the tableau. This scene, however, is clearly secular rather than religious, and harks back to the long-established tradition of "concert" pictures, a genre originating in Venice and exemplified, in its earlier form, by Titian's Le concert champêtre. There is still no description of this artwork. His biographer, the painter Baglione, says he "painted for the Cardinal youths playing music very well drawn from nature and also a youth playing a lute," the latter presumably being The Lute Player, which seems to form a companion-piece to The Musicians. “The Musicians” by Caravaggio The Musicians by Caravaggio shows four boys in classical costume, three playing various musical instruments and singing, the fourth is dressed as Cupid, and reaching towards a bunch of grapes. A group of musicians at work. It may appear later. Artwork analysis, large resolution images, user comments, interesting facts and much more. Kathleen Gilje, Joseph GrigelyRecovering Lost Fictions is a project by contemporary artists Kathleen Gilje and Joseph Grigely that explores the ways in which art is reconfigured by the institutional processes devoted to its study, using the Del Monte version of The Musicians,recently restored by Gilje, as a case study. The picture shows four boys in quasi-Classical costume, three playing various musical instruments or singing, the fourth dressed as Cupid and reaching towards a bunch of grapes. Caravaggio seems to have composed the painting based on … It is held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, where it has been since 1952. The manuscripts show that the boys are practicing madrigals celebrating love, and the eyes of the lutenist, the principal figure, are moist with tears—the songs presumably describe the sorrow of love rather than its pleasures.